Rheumatoid Arthritis Pictures Slideshow

Medical- Medicine

The sedimentation rate (sed rate), another blood test for RA, is a measure of how fast red blood cells fall to the bottom of a test tube.

RA Diagnostic Test: Sedimentation Rate (Sed Rate)

A blood test called the sedimentation rate (sed rate) is a measure of how fast red blood cells fall to the bottom of a test tube. The sed rate is used as a crude measure of inflammation of the joints. The sed rate is usually faster from inflammation such as during disease flares and slower during remissions. Another blood test that is used to measure the degree of inflammation present in the body is the C-reactive protein. The rheumatoid factor, ANA, sed rate, and C-reactive protein tests can also be abnormal in other systemic autoimmune and inflammatory conditions. Therefore, abnormalities in these blood tests alone are not sufficient for a firm diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis

Advertisements

Rheumatoid Arthritis Pictures Slideshow

Medical- Medicine

Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic disease and its inflammation can affect organs and areas of the body other than the joints.

Rheumatoid Arthritis and Inflammation of Organs

Since rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic disease, its inflammation can affect organs and areas of the body other than the joints. Examples of other areas that may be affected include the following:

  • Sj√∂gren’s syndrome is the result of inflammation of the glands of the eyes and mouth and causes dryness of these areas.
  • Rheumatoid inflammation of the lung lining (pleuritis) causes chest pain with deep breathing or coughing.
  • Tissue inflammation surrounding the heart, called pericarditis, can cause chest pain that typically changes in intensity when lying down or leaning forward.
  • Rheumatoid disease can reduce the number of red blood cells (anemia) and white blood cells.
  • Decreased white cells can be associated with an enlarged spleen (Felty’s syndrome) and can increase the risk of infections.
  • Firm lumps under the skin (rheumatoid nodules) can occur around the elbows and fingers where there is frequent pressure.
  • A rare and serious complication is blood-vessel inflammation (vasculitis). Vasculitis can impair blood supply to tissues and lead to tissue death. This is most often initially visible as tiny black areas around the nail beds or as leg ulcers.

28 Days to a Healthier Heart

Heart Disease

Lower heart disease risk by 92% with a simple change each day

Heart Health Day 16: Cook with Garlic

Just one clove a day — or 300 mg 3 times daily — reduces the risk of a heart attack at least three ways: It discourages red blood cells from sticking together and blocking your arteries, it reduces arterial damage, and it discourages cholesterol from lining those arteries and making them so narrow that blockages are likely.

28 Days to a Healthier Heart

Heart Disease

Lower heart disease risk by 92% with a simple change each day

Heart Health Day 12: Stir In Flaxseed

Flaxseed is one of the most potent sources of heart-healthy omega-3 fats. Studies indicate that adding flaxseed to your diet can reduce the development of heart disease by 46%, while helping to keep red blood cells from clumping together and forming clots that can block arteries. Sprinkle 2 tablespoons of flaxseed a day on your yogurt, oatmeal, cereal, or salad. Buy it preground, and keep it refrigerated.

28 Days to a Healthier Heart

Heart Disease

Lower heart disease risk by 92% with a simple change each day

Heart Health Day 7: Start Your Morning With Juice

Orange juice contains folic acid that helps lower your levels of homocysteine, an amino acid linked to a higher heart attack risk. Grape juice is loaded with flavonoids and resveratrol, both potent antioxidants that may discourage red blood cells from clumping together and forming an artery-blocking clot. Choose 100% fruit juices to limit excess sugar.