Bounce Back from a Cold or Flu Fast

Heart Disease

11 best ways to soothe symptoms and speed up recovery

Cover your mouth

Cough and sneeze into a tissue, then toss it. If you don’t have one handy, use your shirtsleeve. As many as 19,500 flu viruses can be expelled in a single cough, so this is the best way to avoid spreading the infection around your house or workplace. If you expel thick, green mucus, you probably have a bacterial infection in your airways (in addition to your cold or flu virus). Call your doctor, who may prescribe antibiotics to clear up the secondary infection.

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Bounce Back from a Cold or Flu Fast

Heart Disease

11 best ways to soothe symptoms and speed up recovery

Have a steamy moment

“Inhaling warm, moist air can help thin out and loosen mucus,” says Czaja. Make a mini steam bath by leaning your head over a bowl of hot water, being careful not to scald yourself. Or indulge in an extra-long shower.

Bounce Back from a Cold or Flu Fast

Heart Disease

11 best ways to soothe symptoms and speed up recovery

Sip some chicken soup

This cold remedy has been used for centuries—with good reason. Cysteine, an amino acid released from chicken during cooking, is chemically similar to a common bronchitis drug. The soup thins mucus and calms the symptoms of a stuffed-up nose and wracking cough. A study published inChest found that even most supermarket brands helped block inflammatory cells, leading to reduced cold symptoms.

Bounce Back from a Cold or Flu Fast

Heart Disease

11 best ways to soothe symptoms and speed up recovery

Sip hot tea

All teas contain theophylline, which is a natural bronchodilator. Choose the brew you find most tasty. Add a little honey if you wish, says Gwen Huitt, MD, director of the Adult Infection Disease Unit at National Jewish Health Hospital. Honey coats the throat to soothe irritation and is rich in infection-fighting antioxidants. It also spurs saliva production, which can help thin out mucus.

9 Superfoods for Your Heart

Heart Disease

The single most important step you can take for heart health starts with what you put on your plate

Lentils

Rx Effect: Reduce blood pressure

The Evidence: One international study followed 12,763 people in the United States, Japan, and six European countries for 25 years. When the results were tallied, legumes—such as lentils—were associated with an 82% reduction in the risk of death from heart disease. The reasons include not only lean vegetable protein and fiber but also folate, magnesium, and potassium. George Mateljan, the author of The World’s Healthiest Foods, calls magnesium “nature’s own calcium channel blocker”—a type of drug that fights hypertension. And by counterbalancing salt, potassium is crucial for keeping blood pressure under control.

Try: TruRoots’s new Sprouted Lentil Trio cooks in just 5 to 7 minutes.

9 Superfoods for Your Heart

Heart Disease

The single most important step you can take for heart health starts with what you put on your plate

Kale
Rx Effect: Prevents atherosclerosis

The Evidence: Your mom was right: You need to consume your dark leafy greens. “Kale has everything you would want in a superfood,” says Joel Fuhrman, MD, the author of the bestseller Eat to Live, who uses diet and exercise to help patients reverse their cardiovascular disease. For starters, kale boasts a bumper crop of heart-healthy antioxidants, omega-3 fatty acids, fiber, folate, potassium, and vitamin E. It’s also rich in lutein, which correlated in the Los Angeles Atherosclerosis Study with protection against early atherosclerosis. Kale even contains an unusual compound, glucoraphanin, that activates a special protective protein called Nrf2. “It creates a sort of Teflon coating in your arteries to keep plaque from adhering,” says Dr. Fuhrman.

Try: For a snack, try Brad’s Raw Leafy Kale—actual kale that is dehydrated, then coated with ground cashews, sunflower seeds, lemon juice, and garlic.

9 Superfoods for Your Heart

Heart Disease

The single most important step you can take for heart health starts with what you put on your plate

Oranges
Rx Effect: Reduce blood pressure, cholesterol, and heart failure

The Evidence: Oranges contain a pharmacy’s worth of salves for the heart. The soluble fiber pectin acts like a giant sponge, sopping up cholesterol in food and blocking its absorption—just like a class of drugs known as bile acid sequestrants. And the potassium in oranges helps counterbalance salt, keeping blood pressure under control.

But new research shows something even more startling: Citrus pectin helps neutralize a protein called galectin-3 that causes scarring of heart tissue, leading to congestive heart failure–a condition that is often difficult to treat with drugs. “Twenty percent of Americans over 50 have high galectin-3,” says Pieter Muntendam, MD, CEO of BG Medicine in Waltham, MA. “A 2009 study showed that a diet high in fruits and vegetables decreased the risk of heart failure by 37%.”

Try: Pectin is contained in the pulp and pith. You’ll get more of it in juice with pulp. Or better yet, eat your oranges.

9 Superfoods for Your Heart

Heart Disease

The single most important step you can take for heart health starts with what you put on your plate

Eat to Your Heart’s Content

With heart disease the number one killer of both men and women in this country, you would think a cure that could dramatically reduce these deaths would be big news. And yet the most effective remedy is so simple that most people can’t seem to believe it works. “In traditional societies, where people don’t eat processed foods, heart disease is rare,” says cardiologist Arthur Agatston, MD, author of The South Beach Wake-Up Call. “If you start with a healthy diet in childhood, heart attacks are almost completely preventable.”

But even if you’ve downed a small army’s worth of french fries, cleaning up your diet as an adult can still have a profound effect. Studies have shown that up to 70% of heart disease can be averted with the right regimen, according to Walter Willett, MD, chair of nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health. But is diet alone as powerful as drugs? “Oh, no, it’s much more powerful,” says Dr. Willett. “Statins, the most effective single medications for reducing heart disease, only cut risk by 25 to 30%.”

In fact, you would need a cabinet full of prescription drugs to bestow all the benefits of a serious heart-healthy meal plan. There’s nothing a drug can do that foods can’t do too—lower our blood pressure (like ACE inhibitors), slash “bad” LDL cholesterol (like statins), reduce harmful triglycerides (like fibrates), raise “good” HDL (like niacin tablets), and prevent the unwanted clotting that causes heart attacks and strokes (like aspirin).

Diet can be so effective that the British Medical Journal published a paper suggesting that doctors shelve the idea of developing a combination drug with multiple heart meds in it—the Polypill, as it’s come to be known. Instead they recommended a Polymeal—a “tastier and safer alternative” that would include wine, fish, dark chocolate, garlic, almonds, and heaping servings of fruits and vegetables. “But the longer you wait, the more likely you’ll need drugs,” warns Dr. Agatston.

In that spirit, here are nine top foods for the heart. But this list is only a beginning. A truly healthy diet features a broad range of fruits, vegetables, nuts, and legumes—not a select few. So while you’re shopping for kale, don’t neglect Swiss chard, arugula, spinach, and romaine. An orange is great, but so are strawberries, apples, bananas, and kiwifruit. Hippocrates understood the concept more than 2,000 years ago: “Let your food be your medicine, and your medicine be your food.”

28 Days to a Healthier Heart

Heart Disease

Lower heart disease risk by 92% with a simple change each day

Heart Health Day 26: Go Bananas with Potassium

To lower your blood pressure, don’t just eat less sodium. You should also increase your potassium intake, as it speeds up the body’s sodium excretion, say researchers at the Hypertension Institute of Nashville. Lead author Mark Houston, MD, says most Americans consume more sodium than potassium, but it should be the other way around. Some popular potassium-rich foods to help fix this: baked potatoes, tomato paste, lima beans, yogurt, cantaloupe, and bananas.

28 Days to a Healthier Heart

Heart Disease

Lower heart disease risk by 92% with a simple change each day

Heart Health Day 24: Indulge in Dark Chocolate

Cap off your day with a nibble of this healthy dessert. Dark chocolate varieties contain flavonoids, antioxidants that make blood vessels more elastic. In one study, 18% of patients who ate it every day saw blood pressure dip. Have an ounce (at least 70% cocoa) daily.

28 Days to a Healthier Heart

Heart Disease

Lower heart disease risk by 92% with a simple change each day

Heart Health Day 16: Cook with Garlic

Just one clove a day — or 300 mg 3 times daily — reduces the risk of a heart attack at least three ways: It discourages red blood cells from sticking together and blocking your arteries, it reduces arterial damage, and it discourages cholesterol from lining those arteries and making them so narrow that blockages are likely.

28 Days to a Healthier Heart

Heart Disease

Lower heart disease risk by 92% with a simple change each day

Heart Health Day 15: Swap In Soy

These plant proteins can help lower cholesterol when you eat them in place of less healthy foods. (Think tofu instead of beef stir-fry or edamame in lieu of dumplings).

It’s best, however, to limit processed soy (from chips and patties) and avoid soy supplements. The problem with these is that we do not always know the amount of phytoestrogens (plant chemicals in soy that function in ways similar to the hormone estrogen) in them. This can make its effects on the human body unpredictable. And exposure to high concentrations of phytoestrogens could stimulate the growth of cells that are responsive to estrogen, which include many breast cancers.

28 Days to a Healthier Heart

Heart Disease

Lower heart disease risk by 92% with a simple change each day

Heart Health Day 14: Unwind With a Little Wine

You’ve probably heard that imbibing is good for you. Research overwhelmingly shows that 1 to 3 ounces of alcohol a day significantly reduces your risk of a heart attack. Unless you have a problem with alcohol, high blood pressure, or risk factors for breast or other cancer, you can safely have one alcoholic drink a day.

Indulge with dinner so you sip slowly. And remember that a full pour in a large wine glass can easily double what’s considered a healthy serving.

28 Days to a Healthier Heart

Heart Disease

Lower heart disease risk by 92% with a simple change each day

Heart Health Day 12: Stir In Flaxseed

Flaxseed is one of the most potent sources of heart-healthy omega-3 fats. Studies indicate that adding flaxseed to your diet can reduce the development of heart disease by 46%, while helping to keep red blood cells from clumping together and forming clots that can block arteries. Sprinkle 2 tablespoons of flaxseed a day on your yogurt, oatmeal, cereal, or salad. Buy it preground, and keep it refrigerated.

Image Collection: Skin Problems

Medical- Medicine
Picture of Corns and Calluses

Picture of Corns and Calluses

Corns: Corns generally occur on the tops and sides of the toes. A hard corn is a small patch of thickened, dead skin with a packed center. A soft corn has a much thinner surface and usually occurs between the 4th and 5th toes. A seed corn is a tiny, discrete callous that can be very tender if it’s on a weight-bearing part of the foot. Seed corns tend to occur on the bottom of the feet, and some doctors believe this condition is caused by plugged sweat ducts.

Calluses:Calluses can develop on hands, feet, or anywhere there is repeated friction — even on a violinist’s chin. Like corns, calluses have several variants. The common callus usually occurs when there’s been a lot of rubbing against the hands or feet. A plantar callus is found on the bottom of the foot.

Boils Pictures Slideshow: Causes, Symptoms and Treatment

Medical- Medicine

When Should I Seek Medical Attention?

You should call your doctor and seek medical attention if:

  • the boil is located on your face, near your spine, or near your anus;
  • a boil is getting larger;
  • the pain is severe;
  • you have a fever;
  • the skin around the boil turns red or red streaks appear;
  • you have a heart murmur, diabetes, any problem with your immune system, or use immune-suppressing drugs (for example, corticosteroids or chemotherapy) and you develop a boil;
  • the boil has not improved after five to seven days of home treatment;
  • you get many boils over several months.

Boils Pictures Slideshow: Causes, Symptoms and Treatment

Medical- Medicine

Should Boils Be Drained?

As long as the boil is small and firm, opening the area and draining the boil is not helpful, even if the area is painful. However, once the boil becomes soft or “forms a head” (that is, a small pustule is noted in the boil), it can be ready to drain. Once drained, pain relief can be dramatic. Most small boils, such as those that form around hairs, drain on their own with soaking and/or heat application. On occasion, and especially with larger boils, the larger boil will need to be drained or “lanced” by a health-care practitioner. Frequently, these larger boils contain several pockets of pus that must be opened and drained.

Boils Pictures Slideshow: Causes, Symptoms and Treatment

Medical- Medicine

What Is the Treatment for a Boil?

Most simple boils can be treated at home. Ideally, the treatment should begin as soon as a boil is noticed since early treatment may prevent later complications. The primary treatment for most boils is heat application, usually with hot soaks or hot packs. Heat application increases the circulation to the area and allows the body to better fight off the infection by bringing antibodies and white blood cells to the site of infection. Do not pop the boil with a needle. This usually results in making the infection worse.