Artificial cardiac pacemaker

Heart Disease
A pacemaker, scale in centimeters

A pacemaker, scale in centimeters

“Cardiac resynchronization therapy” and “CRT (Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy)” redirect here. For the device termed a CRT-D, see Implanted cardiac resynchronization device. For other uses, see Pacemaker (disambiguation).
A pacemaker, scale in centimeters
An artificial pacemaker with electrode for transvenous insertion. The body of the device is about 4 centimeters long, the electrode measures between 50 and 60 centimeters (20 to 24 inches).
A pacemaker (or artificial pacemaker, so as not to be confused with the heart’s natural pacemaker) is a medical device that uses electrical impulses, delivered by electrodes contacting the heart muscles, to regulate the beating of the heart. The primary purpose of a pacemaker is to maintain an adequate heart rate, either because of the heart’s native pacemaker is not fast enough, or there is a block in the heart’s electrical conduction system. Modern pacemakers are externally programmable and allow the cardiologist to select the optimum pacing modes for individual patients. Some combine a pacemaker and defibrillator in a single implantable device. Others have multiple electrodes stimulating differing positions within the heart to improve synchronisation of the lower chambers of the heart.

An artificial pacemaker with electrode for transvenous insertion. The body of the device is about 4 centimeters long, the electrode measures between 50 and 60 centimeters (20 to 24 inches).

An artificial pacemaker with electrode for transvenous insertion. The body of the device is about 4 centimeters long, the electrode measures between 50 and 60 centimeters (20 to 24 inches).

Advertisements

Image Collection Skin Problems

Medical- Medicine
Picture of Acanthosis Nigricans

Picture of Acanthosis Nigricans

Acanthosis nigricans: A skin condition characterized by dark thickened velvety patches, especially in the folds of skin in the axilla (armpit), groin and back of the neck. The condition is complex. It can occur with endocrine diseases such as Cushing disease, tumors of the pituitary, and diabetes mellitus. It is common in people who have insulin resistance — whose body is not responding correctly to the insulin that they make in their pancreas. Acanthosis nigricans also occurs with underlying malignancies (especially carcinomas of the vicera), administration of certain drugs, and as a genetic disorder inherited in an autosomal dominant manner.