Image Collection: Skin Problems

Medical- Medicine
Picture of Corns

Picture of Corns

A corn is a build-up of hard skin near a bony area of a toe or between toes. Corns may be the result of pressure from shoes that rub against the toes or cause friction between the toes. Proper care is necessary if you have a corn.

Advertisements

Image Collection: Skin Problems

Medical- Medicine
Picture of Corns and Calluses

Picture of Corns and Calluses

Corns:┬áCorns generally occur on the tops and sides of the toes. A hard corn is a small patch of thickened, dead skin with a packed center. A soft corn has a much thinner surface and usually occurs between the 4th and 5th toes. A seed corn is a tiny, discrete callous that can be very tender if it’s on a weight-bearing part of the foot. Seed corns tend to occur on the bottom of the feet, and some doctors believe this condition is caused by plugged sweat ducts.

Calluses:Calluses can develop on hands, feet, or anywhere there is repeated friction — even on a violinist’s chin. Like corns, calluses have several variants. The common callus usually occurs when there’s been a lot of rubbing against the hands or feet. A plantar callus is found on the bottom of the foot.

Boils Pictures Slideshow: Causes, Symptoms and Treatment

Medical- Medicine

When Should I Seek Medical Attention?

You should call your doctor and seek medical attention if:

  • the boil is located on your face, near your spine, or near your anus;
  • a boil is getting larger;
  • the pain is severe;
  • you have a fever;
  • the skin around the boil turns red or red streaks appear;
  • you have a heart murmur, diabetes, any problem with your immune system, or use immune-suppressing drugs (for example, corticosteroids or chemotherapy) and you develop a boil;
  • the boil has not improved after five to seven days of home treatment;
  • you get many boils over several months.

Boils Pictures Slideshow: Causes, Symptoms and Treatment

Medical- Medicine

Boil Symptoms

A boil starts as a hard, red, painful lump usually less than an inch in size. Over the next few days, the lump becomes softer, larger, and more painful. Soon a pocket of pus forms on the top of the boil. Signs of a severe infection are

  • the skin around the boil becomes red, painful, and swollen;
  • more boils may appear around the original one;
  • a fever develops;
  • the lymph nodes in the area become swollen.