Artificial cardiac pacemaker

Heart Disease
A pacemaker, scale in centimeters

A pacemaker, scale in centimeters

“Cardiac resynchronization therapy” and “CRT (Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy)” redirect here. For the device termed a CRT-D, see Implanted cardiac resynchronization device. For other uses, see Pacemaker (disambiguation).
A pacemaker, scale in centimeters
An artificial pacemaker with electrode for transvenous insertion. The body of the device is about 4 centimeters long, the electrode measures between 50 and 60 centimeters (20 to 24 inches).
A pacemaker (or artificial pacemaker, so as not to be confused with the heart’s natural pacemaker) is a medical device that uses electrical impulses, delivered by electrodes contacting the heart muscles, to regulate the beating of the heart. The primary purpose of a pacemaker is to maintain an adequate heart rate, either because of the heart’s native pacemaker is not fast enough, or there is a block in the heart’s electrical conduction system. Modern pacemakers are externally programmable and allow the cardiologist to select the optimum pacing modes for individual patients. Some combine a pacemaker and defibrillator in a single implantable device. Others have multiple electrodes stimulating differing positions within the heart to improve synchronisation of the lower chambers of the heart.

An artificial pacemaker with electrode for transvenous insertion. The body of the device is about 4 centimeters long, the electrode measures between 50 and 60 centimeters (20 to 24 inches).

An artificial pacemaker with electrode for transvenous insertion. The body of the device is about 4 centimeters long, the electrode measures between 50 and 60 centimeters (20 to 24 inches).

Image Collection: Skin Problems

Medical- Medicine
Picture of White Bumps (Milia)

Picture of White Bumps (Milia)

Tiny white spots very often appear on a newborn’s face and gums during the first week. The spots are called milia (say “MIL-ee-uh”). Sometimes they also appear on the roof of the mouth (palate), where they are called Epstein pearls. Milia go away by themselves in a few weeks and aren’t harmful.
In the first few months of a baby’s life, any rash associated with other symptoms (such as fever, poor feeding, lethargy, cough) needs to be evaluated by a pediatrician as soon as possible.